MRSA – A Staph Infection

This week’s edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association has both an article and an editorial on MRSA – methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

 

MRSA is a particular kind of kind of Staphylococcus (staph) bacteria that is resistant to many antibiotics. MRSA may cause skin and other infections. Infections with MRSA are becoming more frequent. There are notable increases in healthcare facilities, such as hospitals and extended care facilities. The incidence among athletes is also rising, especially among those in high contact sports, such as football and wrestling.

 

Signs and symptoms of a skin infection caused by staph include:

 

  • Pain and swelling at the site of infection, such as around a cut.
  • Warmth and redness around the site.
  • Pus or other drainage (often a lot) from site
  • Fever.

 

These signs and symptoms require an examination by your healthcare provider, ESPECIALLY if there is fever. While waiting to see your health care provider, wash the area with mild soap and water and cover it with a bandage. WASH YOUR HANDS WITH SOAP AND RUNNING WATER BEFORE AND AFTER TOUCHING THE AREA AND ANYTHING THAT HAS COME IN CONTACT WITH IT. This is very important! MRSA is contagious.

 

Do not attempt to treat the infection yourself. Do not try to drain the pus away.

 

MRSA is treated with antibiotics. But it is important to see a healthcare provider before the infection can spread to other parts of your body.

 

Practicing good hygiene at all times is important in the prevention of MRSA and other infections.

  • Good hand washing.
  • Not sharing towels, bar soap, razors or other personal care items that come in contact with skin.
  • Being extra careful in gyms and locker rooms. MRSA is spread by contact with infected skin or objects that have come in contact with the infection.

 

For more information on MRSA access LINK

 

**Healthcare providers – See a video on the Palmer Method of removing contaminated gown and gloves LINK

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Mary Lou Bernardo, PhD, MSN

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